Articles Posted in Consumer Fraud

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Representing Homeowners in Defending Construction Lien Claimsconstruction

Our New Jersey construction attorneys represent homeowners who, through no fault of their own, have construction liens (called “mechanics liens” in years past) filed against their property.

Typical Scenarios Where Homeowners Get it Trouble

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hauler
Virtually every business in New Jersey is regulated in some way, shape, or form. Accounting firms are regulated by the Department of Law & Public Safety and regulations require accounting firms to have certified public accountants. Home improvement contractors are often required to be registered with the Department of Labor and Department of Treasury. Health clubs are required to register and issue a security bond with the Department of Law and Public Safety. Restaurants are regulated by local health departments. However, businesses which involve the transportation, storage, or disposal of solid waste are some of the most regulated and highly scrutinized businesses in the State of New Jersey.

Solid waste haulers or transporters are regulated by the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (“NJDEP”), Division of Solid Waste Management and/or the Division of Solid & Hazardous Waste Management.

However, first, for tax and liability purposes, a business will generally form a company or business entity (such as a corporation or limited liability company). In doing this, the company will likely file for a Certificate of Formation and a request a FEIN (or Federal Employer Identification Number).

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depositphotos_5503419-Ecological-transport-metaphor-lemon-and-wheels.jpgPurchasing a new car is a major financial investment. Consumers incur high costs to purchase a vehicle and even higher costs to repair defects. Understanding the economic impact, New Jersey’s Legislature passed the New Jersey Lemon Law Act. The law is one of the strongest, most comprehensive, and effective in the country. It protects consumers who purchase or lease vehicles that are defective.

The New Jersey Lemon Law covers all new vehicles that develop a defect during the first two years of ownership or 24,000 miles, whichever comes first. The law covers new passenger cars, trucks, motorcycles, and certain authorized emergency vehicles purchased, leased, or registered in the State of New Jersey. Commercial vehicles are not covered.

The law requires manufacturers to repair reported defects within a reasonable time. The law also provides for remedies to consumers whose vehicles are not repaired and the defect impairs the use, value, or safety of the new vehicle. The law, however, does not vehicle defects which are the results of an accident, abuse, vandalism, or wear and tear. Also, the law does not cover defects caused by repair or modification to a vehicle by a person other than the manufacturer or car dealer.

Defects should be immediately reported to the dealer. Consumers should keep copies of all receipts for repairs and record mileage as well as the repair work completed. Dealers are permitted a reasonable amount of time to make repairs to correct a defect.
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