Please note that, in light of Governor Murphy's recent "stay at home" order in New Jersey due to the COVID-19 pandemic, McLaughlin & Nardi, LLC's attorneys and staff are working remotely at this time. However, we are still ready, willing, and able to address all of your individual and business legal needs. Please contact us by phone at (973) 890-0004 or email at info@esqnj.com. We are committed to providing the same high level of legal services that our clients have come to expect over the years. Thank you.

Articles Tagged with “Tax Law”

Published on:

capitol-22546__180Lawsuits can settle immediately after a complaint is filed or several years into the litigation process on the eve of trial, or even during the course of a trial.  Most cases will settle before a final resolution is determined by a judge or jury.  Settlements generally offer a more favorable resolution than trial for several reasons: (1) both parties avoid the risk of loss at trial, (2) both parties avoid the considerable costs, time, and efforts involved in further litigation and trial, and (3) both parties avoid protracted appeals.

Both parties in a suit seeking monetary damages should consider tax implications in agreeing upon a settlement.  This is true for defendants (the party who is being sued) and plaintiffs (the party who filed the lawsuit) since the defendant may need to make tax deductions prior to disbursement to the plaintiff and/or a plaintiff may need to include some types of settlement proceeds as taxable income.  Further, a defendant may need to issue a 1099 to the plaintiff along with the disbursement of settlement funds.   These determinations are highly fact-sensitive and every party should consult their own CPA or other tax professional who would be most familiar with each parties’ particular situation.

Generally, settlement money received for a personal physical injury is not taxable.  (There are exceptions, but this is the general rule.)  However, it is important to take into consideration that the settlement amounts may be subject to reimbursement to Medicaid/Medicare or medical insurance.  Indeed, the Social Security Act requires that Medicare payments be reimbursed by a subsequent lawsuit recovery, such as a settlement or award.

Published on:

cash-register.jpg Every person or company engaged in a business, trade, or profession in New Jersey (other than as an employee), must register with the State for tax purposes. Retailers doing business in the State are required to collect sales taxes and remit them to the State. Each retailer obtains authority to collect sales taxes through a Certificate of Authority issued by New Jersey’s Division of Taxation. This Certificate must be prominently displayed at each retailer’s place of business.

However, some organizations can obtain exempt status for purchases, meaning that they do not need to pay sales taxes. These organizations must obtain an exemption certificates and must present them to retailers when purchasing goods and/or services that are generally subject to sales tax. The retailers must then keep the physical certificates for at least four years after the date of the transaction, and make them available for inspection by the Division of Taxation if it should request.
Continue reading

Published on:

metropolis.jpg

Sales taxes are an inevitable part of life in New Jersey, and indeed, across the country. Sales taxes make it possible for the state to fund important government programs and operations such as transportation infrastructures, aid to schools (to the extent that it supplements local property tax and other funding sources), health and welfare aid programs, licensing and compliance departments, and other general state expenditures.

However, individual taxpayers may also benefit from their payment of sales tax on a more direct basis by claiming sales taxes as an itemized deduction on their tax returns. Generally people who itemize their deductions for their federal taxes also deduct their income taxes. However, taxpayers have the option to elect to deduct any state and local general sales taxes paid during the course of the year instead.
Continue reading

Contact Information